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Hartside, County Durham Crook DL15 9NN

01388 766686

hartside@durhamlearning.net

2014 - 2015

Click here to download the 2014-15 information as a PDF document.

Each year the school receives a substantial amount of money called the Pupil Premium Grant. This grant provides additional funds to school for each child who is currently or has been at any time in the last 6 years entitled to receive Free School Meals (FSM) and for those children who are ‘Looked After’ by the Local Authority (CLA).  In 2014 – 2015 Hartside Primary School received £84,000 of pupil premium funding.  This was broken down as follows:

Type of Pupil/Need Amount Received per pupil Number of pupils Total Amount Received
Entitled to Free School Meals £1,300 64 £83,100.00
Service Children £300 3 £900.00
Looked after by the Local Authority 0 £0
Total 67 £84,000.00

Case Study – In September 2014, Pupil B, who was in receipt of PP funding, entered Year Six.  Pupil B had consistently been defined as a persistent absentee, team around the family meetings were established by school and support was provided to address her attendance.  In addition, in school intervention programmes were initiated to improve Pupil B’s relationships with her peers and attitude to learning.  Pupil B began to close the gap. Pupil B’s attendance improved, the support continued, through one to one tuition and other initiatives described below, Pupil B’s progress accelerated and consequently made better than expected progress to leave school ‘on track’ for reading writing, GPS and maths.

Year Attendance
EYFS 66.8%
Year One 64%
Year Two 82%
Year Three 79.3%
Year Four 70.5%
Year Five 87.3%
Year Six 92.3%

 

 

There now follows a detailed breakdown of PP funding expenditure, evaluation and impact of actions taken.

Attendance

Focus

Strategy

Cost

Evaluation

Impact

To improve school attendance for children in receipt of Pupil Premium funding to reduce the overall gap to other children to less than 2%. 

 

 

 

 

To reduce the number of children in receipt of PP funding who are defined as persistent absentees and close the gap to National Averages to at least 3%.

 

 

 

To improve the punctuality of children in receipt of Pupil Premium funding and reduce those who arrive late to school to less than 40% of the total number. 

 

 

By providing a school breakfast club and subsidising the cost for children in receipt of pupil premium funding. 

 

By updating the school curriculum and organising more regular/termly class trips.  Then subsidising the costs for children in receipt of PP funding.

 

By monitoring attendance data of children in receipt of PP funding more regularly and meeting with parents of children who attendance slips below school expectations.

 

By rewarding children for good attendance.

 

By employing a parent support advisor to work with parents of vulnerable and disadvantaged children increasing attendance, punctuality and standards of behaviour and safety.

 

By constructing a school bike shed and encouraging more children to travel to school by this means.

£1,500.00 - School breakfast club.

 

£3,223.00 - School trips and residential experiences

 

£150.00 - Assembly prizes

 

£7,653.00 – Parent Support Advisor

 

£4,000.00 Contribution to bike shed

Massive growth in popularity of breakfast club overall numbers have increased to more than 50 of which 25% are entitled to PP funding.

 

Children arrive at school on time and have a good start to the day.

 

All children attend at least one trip per half term.

 

In 2013 18% of children who attended Robinwood residential experience were in receipt of Pupil Premium funding. In 2014 this increased to 36%. 

 

Attendance

2013

2014

2015

All Pupils Nationally

4.8

3.9

4

FSM

7.6

6.2

5.3

Non FSM

4.8

3.5

3.9

Gap to National

-2.8

-2.3

-1.3

Closing the in school  gap

2.8

2.7

1.4

 

Persistent absenteeism

2013

2014

2015

All Pupils Nationally

3.6

2.8

2.7

FSM

12

7.7

5.3

Non FSM

4.3

2.5

0.9

Gap to National

-8.4

-4.9

-2.6

Closing the in school  gap

7.7

5.2

4.4

 

2013 – 2014 63% of children whose attendance was less than 90% were disadvantaged.  2014 – 2015 this had reduced to 42%. 

 

Overall Attendance

Persistent Absenteeism

2013

93.97%

5.85%

2014

95.7%

2.30%

2015

95.4%

2.04%

 

% of total children arriving late to school who are entitled to PP funding. 

2013

2014

51%

45%

Attendance increased from 93.8 to 94.7.

 

Gap to National average is now 1.3% - Target achieved.

 

% of children defined as persistent absentees reduced by 2.4%.

 

Gap to National average is now 2.6% - Target achieved.

 

Overall % of total number of children arriving late who are entitled to PP funding has reduced but this will remain a target for next academic year.  

 

 

Behaviour

Focus

Strategy

Cost

Evaluation

Impact

To improve standards of behaviour so that the % of children with behaviour incidents logged who fall into the PP category reduces by at least 10% and that the total number of recorded incidents decreases.

By providing extracurricular opportunities and resources to inspire learning and passion for school.

 

 

POP UK Concert £1,500

 

 

£8,500.00 playground development

 

 

The whole school took part in the POP UK project which was tremendously well received by the local community.  Feedback was excellent.

 

Playground equipment on the school yard has contributed to the overall safety and enjoyment of all children in school. 

 

There are fewer behaviour incidents on the school yard.  Children play safely and share games/equipment with respectful, caring attitudes. 

 

% of all children with behaviour incidents logged who fall into the PP category.

 

2012 - 2013

2013 - 2014

2014 -2015

54%

46%

40%

 

The overall total number of behaviour incidents reduced by 32% in 2014 to 2015. 

 

Incidents

Total

2013 - 2014

659

2014 - 2015

446

 

Severity of behaviour incidents has fallen by 33%. 

 

Score Total (Severity)

Total

2013 - 2014

2166

2014 - 2015

1472

 

Allegations of bullying fell by 80% from 10 down to 2.

 

% of all children with behaviour incidents logged who fall into the PP category has reduced to 40%. 

 

 

96% of parents either agreed or strongly agreed that their child enjoys school in the parent survey completed in February 2015 (105 Responses)

 

92% of all children either agreed or strongly agreed that they enjoyed school in the most recent pupil survey. 

 

 

 

 

EYFS

Focus

Strategy

Cost

Evaluation

Impact

To provide an excellent start to children’s time in school and increase the number of children on track on entry Reception class particularly targeting children in receipt of PP funding.

By opening a Governor run nursery provision on our school site and delivering a high quality EYFS education.

 

By building relationships with families in the PP category earlier to support a smooth transition into school.

 

By ensuring that EYFS staff are fully trained to provide support and high quality education and that the EYFS department runs as a unit and supports children for their transition into school.

£6,500.00 Contribution to nursery development

 

 

 

 

£759.00 EYFS Trips and Events

 

 

£602.00 – Staff Training

Pupil numbers within the EYFS unit have increased dramatically due the quality of provision being offered. 

 

New staff members have been employed to meet pupil to staff ratios.

 

Objective led planning and play based curriculum have increased the number and quality of observations that are made and driven up standards and progress by informing planning and assessment. 

 

 

Overall % of children reaching a Good Level of Development (GLD) in the last three years has increased and is now above National average:

 

2013

2014

2015

21.4%

58.6%

76.9%

 

% of children who are entitled to PP funding and reached the GLD increased from 2013 to 2014.  Although this reduced in 2015 these children made better than expected progress from ‘significantly low’ starting points. 

 

2013

2014

2015

0%

45%

33%

(50% including service child)

 

The overall % of children on track ‘on entry’ to Reception class has increased dramatically and is now consistently above 70% in all areas of the EYFS curriculum.  14/30 children came through the school nursery.

 

40% (2/5) of the disadvantaged children currently in the reception class came through the school nursery.  Although they were not at the expected stage of development on entry, from their ‘significantly low’ starting point, they made ‘better than expected’ progress in nursery to close the gap on their peers.

 

Overall number of children reaching Good level of development has increased and is now above National Average.

 

Children enter school earlier and establish good understanding of routines and school procedures.

 

Progress of children in receipt of PP funding was accelerated through the school nursery to close the gap on their peers. 

 

 

Literacy - Reading

Focus

Strategy

Cost

Evaluation

Impact

To raise standards and improve outcomes in reading for children in receipt of PP funding.  

 

To close the gap between children in receipt of PP funding and their peers to within 2.5 points.

 

To increase the number of boys in receipt of PP funding on track with reading and close the gap on the girls.

By ensuring that every class has a full time teaching assistant and that their support is effective.

 

£29,890

Procedures for teaching phonics were changed to a more systematic and streamlined approach across the school.  Staff training was provided and confidence increased.

 

Older reading books were removed.  One scheme was chosen and applied across the school to give progression more continuity.

 

Cracking Comprehension has streamlined the approach to teaching comprehension in KS2.  Staff and pupil confidence has increased.  More progression data is evident in pupil’s books to inform teacher assessment. 

 

Training was delivered to teaching assistants and whole school monitoring indicated that standards have improved. 

 

Library has been refurbished and relaunched and this has resulted in increased numbers of children using the facility and improved passion for reading.

% of children passing the phonics screening test

 

 

2012 - 2013

 

2013 - 2014

 

2014 - 2015

 

 

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

FSM

38

57

-19

56

70

-14

58

66

-8

Non FSM

81

73

-35

67

78

-22

76

80

-22

Gap

-43

 

 

-11

 

 

-18

 

 

 

11/29 of the Y2 children did not pass the phonic screening test in Y1.  Of these 4/11 are in receipt of PP funding.  2/4 passed the phonic screening test in Y2 (One child was 2 marks away). 

 

Key Stage One Reading

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

 

 

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

FSM

11.7

14.8

-3.1

14.4

15

-0.6

14.1

15.2

-1.1

Non FSM

16.4

16.8

-5.1

16.9

17

-2.6

16.7

17.1

-3

Gap

-4.7

 

2

-2.5

 

2

-2.6

 

1.9

 

Overall progress for all children who are in receipt of pupil premium funding but are not on the SEN register was higher than the whole school average and better than expected.  Consequently the % of PP children on track or better for reading has increased. 

 

 

Progress

On Track or Better

Working towards

2013 – 2014

4.8

81%

19%

2014 - 2015

4.7

91%

9%

 

Key Stage Two Reading

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

 

 

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

FSM

67

78

-11

60

82

-22

40

83

-43

Non FSM

88

89

-22

87

92

-32

82

92

-52

Gap

-21

 

11

-27

 

10

-42

 

9

 

Attainment remains an issue in KS2, as we address previous inaccuracies in assessment data.  However, the work that we have done so far has had an impact on standards of achievement in the last two years. 

 

Y3 (2012)

Y4 (2013)

Y5 (2014)

Y6 (2015)

2.2

0

5.8

4.2

Phonics Screening Test

The gap between the % of FSM children passing the phonics screening test and the national average (NA) has decreased. 

The gap between FSM children and Non NSM children nationally is also decreasing. 

 

Reading

The gap between FSM and Non FSM children in KS1 has reduced.  The gap between in School FSM children and National FSM children reduced in 2014 but climbed in 2015.

 

Only 1/8 of these FSM children were on track at the end of EYFS by the end of Y2 4/8 children were on track with age related expectations. 

 

100% of these children made better than expected progress from their starting points during Key Stage One.  The in school gap remained at 2.6 points so this will remain a target for next year.

 

Numbers of children on track with age related expectations have increased. 

 

The gap between the school’s children who are in receipt of PP funding and the National Average for children who are not in receipt of PP funding is gradually increasing.  The in school increase data is affected by issues within cohorts but will be a school priority for next year. 

 

81% of children who received 1:1 tuition for reading made better than expected progress and achieved their end of year targets. 

By completing staff training to develop skills in the delivery of reading skills.

N/A

By purchasing resources to raise enthusiasm for and standards in learning.

 

£665.00

By purchasing a boy friendly reading scheme and launching it for more reluctant readers.

 

£2,068

By teaching specific reading objectives in the classroom through guided reading lessons to accelerate progress of children and then to share best practice amongst the teaching staff within the school.

 

N/A

By holding staff to account for progress in reading through performance management targets.

 

N/A

By providing 1:1 tuition for children in receipt of PP funding

 

£3,000.00

(across reading, writing, GPS and maths)

 

Literacy - Writing

Focus

Strategy

Cost

Evaluation

Impact

To raise standards and improve outcomes in writing for children in receipt of PP funding so that the gap in KS1 and KS2 is less than 2 points. 

 

To increase the % of children in receipt of PP funding attaining the expected level of development at the end of KS2 is at least 60% and the gap to the National average continues to reduce.

 

To increase the overall school average % of children on track to at least 70%.

 

 

By developing the skills of teaching staff in the delivery of writing skills and then sharing best practice through staff meetings.

N/A

Regular in school moderation between class teachers and sharing of best practice has increased teachers’ skills and confidence in the delivery and assessment of writing.

 

Training in providing wider opportunities for writing across the curriculum was provided for all staff and SSE has supported the quality of teaching and learning in the classroom.  This has led to increase in staff confidence and overall standards of learning as represented in data.

 

In school competitions have raised the profile of writing and increased enthusiasm amongst children.

 

Displays have showcased high standards of writing and challenged children to improve their own work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key Stage One

In Key Stage One, the gap in APS between FSM and Non FSM children is closing and is now within 1 point.  The gap between in school FSM children and NA Non FSM children is also closing. 

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

 

 

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

FSM

11.7

13.5

-1.8

12.7

13.7

-1

13.4

14

-0.6

Non FSM

14.5

15.5

-3.8

14.9

15.6

-2.9

15.3

15.8

-2.4

Gap

-2.8

 

2

-2.2

 

1.9

-1.9

 

1.8

 

Key Stage Two

In KS2, the percentage of FSM children attaining level 4 or above has increased over the last three years.  This has reduced the gap to national FSM children and also National Non FSM Children. 

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

 

 

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

FSM

17

74

-57

50

76

-26

60

79

-19

Non FSM

76

84

-67

80

89

-39

94

90

-30

Gap

-59

 

10

-30

 

13

-34

 

11

 

The APS gap between FSM children and Non FSM children nationally is reducing. 

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

 

 

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

FSM

20

25.9

-5.9

22.2

26.3

-4.1

23.4

26.6

-3.2

Non FSM

26.3

28.2

-8.2

26.2

28.6

-6.4

29.1

28.8

-5.4

Gap

-6.3

 

2.3

-4

 

2.3

-5.7

 

2.2

 

Overall progress for children who are in receipt of pupil premium funding but are not on the SEN register was higher than the whole school average and better than expected.  Consequently the % of PP children on track or better for writing has increased. 

 

 

Progress

On Track or Better

Working towards

2013 – 2014

4.3

62%

38%

2014 - 2015

4.2

70%

30%

 

 

The in-school attainment gap between in KS1 is less than 2 points and the difference between FSM children in school and the same children nationally is now less than 1 point.  The gap to children who do not receive PP funding nationally remains above 2 points so we will continue to address this next academic year. 

 

In KS2, the in-school gap widened in 2015 due to the makeup of the cohort of children but overall attainment increased by 1.2 points.  The gap between FSM children in-school and those nationally has closed to 3.2 points abd the gap to N.PP children nationally has reduced from 8.2 to 5.4 in the last two years.  This will remain a school priority next academic year.

 

The % of children reaching the expected level of development has increased from 17% to 60% over the last two years.  The gap between school children and the National Average has reduced from 57% to 19%.  This demonstrates excellent progress. 

 

Staff confidence in the delivery of writing has increased substantially. 

 

Regular writing displays are created around school to showcase improving standards in writing.

 

 

By building in more cross school moderation to ensure class teachers work together to raise standards.

N/A

By holding staff to account through performance management for standards in writing.

N/A

By accessing support from advisory teachers at LA level to provide staff training and then assuring all staff follow new procedures and share best practice. 

 

Part of school SLA

By launching school initiatives and competitions to raise the profile of and enthusiasm for writing.

 

£500.00 for prizes and advertising

By creating displays to showcase good examples of writing around the school and celebrating the achievements of children.

 

£500.00 for display resources

By organising family learning programmes to help members of the community understand expectations for writing.

£500.00 Refreshments for family learning

 

Literacy - Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling

Focus

Strategy

Cost

Evaluation

Impact

To increase the % of children in receipt of PP funding who reach the expected level of development in GPS tests at the end of KS2 and to close the gap to their peers. 

 

To improve the quality of spelling across the school so that standards rise.

By identifying children who require support and then providing appropriate intervention.

 

N/A

GPS Intervention was provided for identified children.  The overall number of children reaching the expected level of development increased from 60% to 68%.  This demonstrates that the intervention was in part successful. 

 

Children in receipt of PP funding made good progress as evidenced in their books and moderated through school self-evaluation (SSE). However, only 20% of children reached the expected stage of development (Level 4).

 

Spelling guides raised the profile of spelling across the school, aligned the school homework policy and raised expectations for home learning.  Impact will be measured next academic year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014

 

2015

 

 

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

FSM

40

66

-26

20

43

-23

Non FSM

73

81

-41

53

61

-41

Gap

-33

 

15

-33

 

18

 

The number of children reaching the required standard for GPS has decreased in 2015 but the in-school gap has remained the same.  The gap between in-school children who are in receipt of PP funding and the national average achieving the expected standard has reduced. 

 

 

The in-school gap between those children in receipt of PP funding and those that are not has remained the same.  This was affected by the level of SEN within the 2015 cohort. 

By producing spelling guides for children to support home learning.

 

£500.00

By providing family learning to members of the school community to make them more aware of expectations.

 

£100.00

By updating the school marking policy to make sure that all staff and visitors pay particular attention to spelling. 

N/A

 

Maths

Focus

Strategy

Cost

Evaluation

Impact

To raise standards and improve outcomes in maths so that the gap between children in receipt of PP funding and those that are not is reduced to 2 points. 

 

To increase the overall % of children who are in receipt of PP funding but do not have SENs to at least 70%. 

 

To close the gap in the number of children attaining Level 4 by at least 10%.

 

 

By introducing new resources to support children in learning number facts.

 

N/A

Number fact pack has provided staff with a system to monitor the progress of children’s development in this area. 

 

Education City and Maths Whizz resources are used by all class teachers to enhance the quality of children’s learning experiences.  These are both very popular with children. 

 

At Key Stage One, the in-school gap between FSM and Non FSM children has closed over the last three years.  Although the gap to NA widened very slightly in 2015, it has closed significantly from 2013 and only 21% of the 2015 cohort were on track at the end of EYFS.

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

 

 

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

FSM

12

14.8

-2.8

14.1

15

-0.9

14.1

15.1

-1

Non FSM

15.8

16.5

-4.5

16.6

16.7

-2.6

16.4

16.9

-2.8

Gap

-3.8

 

1.7

-2.5

 

1.7

-2.3

 

1.8

 

Over the last two years, whole school progress for children who are in receipt of PP funding but not SEN was better than expected.  This reduced in 2015, so action will be taken to address this in 2016. 

 

 

Progress

On Track or Better

Working towards

2013 – 2014

4.3

65%

35%

2014 - 2015

3.8

73%

27%

 

The number of children on track or better for maths who are in receipt of pupil premium funding but not SEN has increased.

 

End of Key Stage Two Data

 

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

 

 

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

FSM

27

27

0

24.6

27.2

-2.6

23.4

27.3

-3.9

Non FSM

29.5

29.5

-2.5

28.6

29.8

-5.2

28.8

29.8

-6.4

Gap

-2.5

 

2.5

-4

 

2.6

-5.4

 

2.5

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

 

 

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

School

NA

Gap

FSM

83

77

6

50

78

-28

60

80

-20

Non FSM

100

88

-5

87

90

-40

94

90

-30

Gap

-17

 

11

-37

 

12

-34

 

10

 

Attainment at the end of KS2 has reduced over the last three years and the gap between, those in receipt of PP funding and those that are not, has widened.  This will be a school priority next academic year.  This was affected by the makeup of the 2015 cohort of children. 3/5 of these children were on the school’s SEN register, tracking showed they made better than expected progress from their starting points

 

In 2015, the gap in the number of children who achieved the expected level of development and were in receipt of PP funding and the NA for children both in receipt and not in receipt of the funding reduced from 2014 data. 

Gap in average point score in Key Stage One is -2.3 points which is lower than in previous years. 

 

The overall percentage of children in receipt of PP funding but not on the SEN register who are on track with mathematics, has increased from 65% to 73%. 

By introducing more problem solving to the maths curriculum through weekly lessons.

 

N/A

By providing more learning opportunities outside of the classroom.

 

N/A

By offering support to the parents of disadvantaged children through family learning programmes.

 

£300.00

By providing more IT based maths software to open up learning opportunities for children in receipt of PP funding.

 

£665.00

 

Other Curriculum

Focus

Strategy

Cost

Impact

To improve the health, diet and lifestyle of children and families in receipt of PP funding.

By organising a family learning programme with a home economics teacher from the local comprehensive school and ensuring that every child in receipt of PP funding has the opportunity to receive lessons in cooking both independently and with their parent/carer.

£4,560.00

All children in receipt of PP from Y1 – Y4 attended cookery lessons.  Parents attended an after school club so that children and adults could cook together and learn about nutrition and healthy living.  Feedback was excellent and relationships between school and the community were vastly improved.

To improve children access to the digital curriculum and increase enthusiasm for learning.

By purchasing a suite of tablet PCs and making sure that every child has access to one in the classroom.

 

£2,187.00

Tablet PCs are now available across the school and are regularly accessed by children in receipt of PP funding.  Digital resources improve the quality of the school’s curriculum and motivate children to be active learners.  The school technician ensures that all hard and software is kept up to date and brokers new equipment and resources.  All IT problems are resolved quickly and efficiently meaning that the quality of teaching and learning remains consistently high. 

By purchasing software to support children in receipt of PP in developing digital literacy skills.

 

£556.00

By employing a technician in association with the local cluster of primary schools to ensure that the school network runs smoothly and is accessible to all children.

£3,622.00